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Diablo name

Diablo_Canyon_SliderHow Diablo Canyon Got Its Name – Fred Collins Continue reading

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Diablo Danger

Diablo Canyon: Secret document details federal safety inspector’s alarm over plant’s vulnerability to earthquakes

Posted Aug. 25, 2014 / Posted by: Kate Colwell

Agency expert says reactors must be shut until proven safe

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In an explosive document kept secret for a year, a former federal inspector charges that the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant in California is more vulnerable to earthquakes than initially known and should be shut down until Pacific Gas & Electric Co. can prove its safety. Continue reading

California State Lands Commission

Richard Greenwood
California State Lands Commission,
12th Floor, 200 Oceangate,
Long Beach, CA 90802.

RE: State Permit PRC 8391, Fugro Petagos, Inc.

Dear Mr. Greenwood,

The Northern Chumash Tribal Council (NCTC) has forwarded a permit issued by your office for sonic testing around the Sacred Chumash Nations Santa Cruz and Anacapa Islands, which is to start February 9th 2013.   This permit was issued January 21, 2013.  On December 3, 2012 NCTC sent you a letter expressing the California Native American Chumash Tribal concerns about the California State Lands Commission’s ability to thoroughly review geo-physical permitting process and the effects on California Native American Cultural Resources, which the animal and plants nations.  In our December letter to you we describe the potential for sonic/seismic testing to disrupt the natural life pattern of zoo plankton too endangered Gray Whales and migratory pathways of fish, turtles, whales, dolphins, and all birds and mammals that feed on any of the affected above mentioned ocean life.  The 10 day narrow window for comment period concerning the geo-physical permits in which your office issues, is flawed.  This short narrow window for meaningful consultation and meaningful input is one of the glaring points of the CSLC geo-physical permitting process that is dire need of review.  Based on this one point alone NCTC is asking the CSLC to postpone the finalization/authorization of the above referenced permit until the review of CSLC geo-physical permitting process has been completed, and we are asking you and your office to not permit any new geo-physical permits until this already in review process is completed. Continue reading

Tribal Protocol

Ms. Cindy Bladey, Chief
Rules, Announcements and Directives Branch (RADB)
Office of Administration
Mail Stop: TWB-05-BO1M
U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Washington, DC 20555-0001

RE: Draft Tribal Protocol Manual (TPM)

Dear Ms. Bladey:

Please find following Comments for NRC Draft Tribal Protocol Manual (TPM):

The Northern Chumash Tribal Council (NCTC) is located in San Luis Obispo California, and was formed under the guidelines of California Senate Bill 18 April 26, 2006 as a California State Recognized Tribal Government by the California Native American Heritage Commission, local Chumash community and local government. Organized and dedicated to preservation of the California Native American Chumash Culture, and Sacred Sites. NCTC is dedicated to meaningful consulting with Federal, State, local governments and agencies, consulting with the development community, and supporting tribal community well-being.

NCTC is an “affected tribe”, the PG&E nuclear power plant located between Avila Beach and Morro Bay California, is built on top of NCTC’s and the Chumash Nations Ancestors Sacred Village Site. All the land and ocean around the power plant is Sacred to the Chumash Peoples. The Chumash Peoples have live along the Central California Coast for over 15,000 years. The Chumash village at the power plant site dates beyond 9,000 years. The Chumash have live and been a part of this land forever.
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Chris Jordan

I met a young man in the hospital a couple of years ago, he was dying and wanted to speak to me, I gave him what courage I have, he was able to find a transplant and recovered, his mother is an active member of Mothers for Peace, and Sierra Club, both working on de-commissioning Diablo, he is now in his early twenty’s.

Please click HERE to take a look at the new art piece by Chris Jordan.

And here’s a quote from him about the reason for the piece:

“I hope my Unsinkable piece reaches you in the spirit in which it was intended: as an act of love on behalf of Life and all Beings. I believe deeply in the power of collective feeling, and particularly grief, as a doorway back into connection with our unifying love for the sacred miracle of our world. Humanity needs a new story that transcends the limitations of our divided and fear-based worldviews. And only love can conquer fear, as the ancients teach us. So how can we remind a billion people in the industrialized world that they are made of love, that each moment is a sacred prayer of love, that life is an incomprehensibly beautiful spirit dance we have each won the lottery ticket of the Universe to attend?! If we in the “first world” could collectively remember this, then bridging our differences and joining to solve the problems we have caused (such as assembling a vast mulit-national task force to stabilize Unit 4 at Fukushima–cost and politics being no object) would be fast and fun!”

Be well,

Fred

Comments to NRC

 

Sarah L. Lopas
NEPA Communications Project Manager
Waste Confidence Directorate
Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards
U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Mail Stop EBB-2B2
Washington, DC 20555-0001
HQ Office (301) 492-3425
HQ Fax (301) 492-3357
Home Office (443) 708-7002

RE: Confidence Decision

The Northern Chumash Tribal Council (NCTC) is located in San Luis Obispo California, and was formed under the guidelines of California Senate Bill 18 April 26, 2006 as a California State Recognized Tribal Government by the California Native American Heritage Commission, organized and dedicated to preservation of the California Native American Chumash Culture, and Sacred Sites. NCTC is dedicated to meaningful consulting with Federal, State, local governments and agencies, consulting with the development community, and supporting tribal community well-being.

NCTC is an “affected tribe”, the PG&E nuclear power plant located between Avila Beach and Morro Bay California, is built on top of NCTC’s Ancestors village site. All the land and ocean around the power plant is Sacred to the Chumash Peoples. The Chumash Peoples have live along the Central California Coast for over 15,000 years. The Chumash village at the power plant site dates beyond 9,000 years. The Chumash have live and been a part of this land forever.
Continue reading