Sanctuary Economic Report

The Potential Economic Impacts of the

Proposed Central Coast National Marine Sanctuary

Prepared for the Sierra Club of California

By Jason Scorse, Ph.D. and Judith Kildow, Ph.D.

September 2014

i. Acknowledgments

The authors want to thank William Douros, Western Regional Director of National Marine Sanctuaries, for providing important financial information about sanctuary budgets; student assistant Maren Gardiner Farnum, for her research and analytical work; Professor Gary Griggs for providing information about marine institutional budgets in the Monterey Crescent; Deirdre Whalen and other Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary staff members for providing a range of information on tourism and other sanctuary activities that we could never have gotten without their assistance. We also want to thank Sarah Carr of EBM Tools Listserve and everyone who contributed citations per her request, for helping to compile our extensive bibliography on the economics of MPAs. Continue reading

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Diablo Danger

Diablo Canyon: Secret document details federal safety inspector’s alarm over plant’s vulnerability to earthquakes

Posted Aug. 25, 2014 / Posted by: Kate Colwell

Agency expert says reactors must be shut until proven safe

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In an explosive document kept secret for a year, a former federal inspector charges that the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant in California is more vulnerable to earthquakes than initially known and should be shut down until Pacific Gas & Electric Co. can prove its safety. Continue reading

Wolf ecoengineers

How Wolves Change Rivers

“When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.” – John Muir

When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable “trophic cascade” occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix.

American Indian Education Day

Gathering/Spisumu: Welcome / Haku to Cal Poly

Early_California_Polytechnic_SchoolSpisumu is the Obispeño Chumash invitation to ‘gather together’ and Haku is the Inseño Chumash word for welcome. In that spirit, you are invited to a day of learning at Cal Poly for American Indian students, elders and Families Continue reading